Blog Archives


The future of edtech is an annual tech conference that looks at transforming higher education through the digital, it brings together industry partners, academics, students and influencers from across 50 countries. This year it moved to an online conference, and the landing page offered all the amenities of a ‘real time’ conference.

The virtual lobby

Each session was 20 minutes, and recorded and shared on vimeo, and then the Q&A which was not captured.The speakers then moved into the networking lounge for further chat.

Here are the links to the main sessions:

The VC Panel_ What’s on the horizon for higher education during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond

Imperial college business school talk

– excellent section by Sarah, (second speaker) on quality and how to-conceptualising the whole experience ie not just the f-2-f but how to scaffold the whole student learning experience

Developing university capacity and capability through external partnerships

Prof Norbert Pachler

EDUCATE Presents Exploring the Real Use of AI in HE Today

Prof Rose Luckin

Using data to improve student outcomes Panel:

The student panel:

Not recorded but these were key points:

Please use good practice; ask us to engage and switch on our camera, change the pace; offer small chunks; engage us the whole of the time!  Change the pedagogies to more active learning – we enjoy this but need more reflective time if we then have a group task. Linked In – use this and it is super useful…

My session: Augmented reality, Virtual reality and Mixed reality for student learning

Getting ready to host

The international roundtable had participants from the USA, Turkey, the Netherlands, Germany, France, Malta as well as the UK.

The brief discussion notes i followed are available here:

https://www.slideshare.net/debbieholley1/augmented-reality-virtual-reality-and-mixed-reality-for-student-learning

The main report mentioned in the slideshare:

The Immersive Learning Research Network (iLRN) is leading The State of XR and Immersive Learning, a multi-sector, cross-disciplinary initiative aimed at:
Regularly surveying the XR and immersive learning landscape to identify the technological, pedagogical, and other innovations exhibiting the most promise, along with the major opportunities and challenges related to their uptake, adoption, and implementation;
Advancing research and promoting research-grounded practice in the use of XR and immersive technologies for supporting learners across the full span of learning from K-12 through higher education
As well as in workplace, community, and lifelong learning.

Full report launched at their annual conference 20th June



You can listen to the whole podcast, or select which section:

Listen to our 20 minute podcast about the tools and techniques you can use in Brightspace, We recorded this podcast in panopto audio.

Timings:

0-3 minutes – synchronous/asynchronous approaches

3-5 minutes – the virtual classroom

5-7 minutes – Panopto

7-10  minutes – interactive tools

10-12 minutes- sources of information

12-15 minute – moving to online learning; the student focus and the Pulse app

16-18 academics concerns about recording

18-20 minutes thinking about redesigning your delivery

Category: ALTC

LD@3 weekly programme


Here is the weekly programme for LD@3 for next week (w/c 6 April):
Monday, 6 April (3-4pm BST):Cathy Malone, Charlotte Coleman, David Busby Supporting student study circleshttps://meet.google.com/gcm-qiuc-wsw?hs=122

Tuesday, 7 April (3-4pm BST):ALDinHE Steering Group (chaired by Kate Coulson)Annual General Meetinghttps://meet.google.com/wzi-rqvg-dne?hs=122

Wednesday, 8 April (3-4pm BST):
Mark Dawson Nevermind the ‘buzz’ quiz https://meet.google.com/xfz-nxqo-rww?hs=122


and this weeks finale – we launched our assessment and feedback toolkit at the ALDinHE conference 2019. Here is the link to the webpage and last years presentations Direct link to the Assessment and Feedback toolkit

Informed by the conclusion of Ball et al (2012 p8) that assessment practice in most universities has not kept pace with other far-reaching changes in HE and that “a radical rethink of assessment practices and regulations” and a “holistic and proactive approach” is required, the Centre for Excellence in Learning at BU (now FLIE) implemented an evidence-based vision involving radical change to institution-wide assessment policy. By using a collaborative and partnership approach the development of key resources in the form of an Assessment & Feedback Toolkit was made possible. The principles-based and evidence-based strategy focused on a rebalancing of summative and formative assessment tasks; a broader menu of assessment types; and the promotion of technology-enhanced learning strategies facilitated by a new VLE. The CEL team drew on leadership strategies set out in Quinney et al (2017) and invited large-scale engagement through Faculty Fiestas and external events (Quinney et al 2018) to critically inform the process.

Building on the success of the TEL Toolkit (Biggins et al 2017) an online Assessment & Feedback Toolkit was developed to support the changes. We will share critical reflections on our approach to enable others to undertake a similar institution-wide approach to bring about clear benefits for staff and students. The Toolkit includes resources for formative assessment activities; assessment literacy strategies and has help, guidance and suggestions for planning assessments.

The development team:
Professor Debbie Holley, (former head of CEL) Anne Quinney (assessment and Feedback Theme leader (pictured); Learning Technologist Vince Clark, sincere thanks to BU Visiting Professor Dai Hounsell for his advice and guidance.


Informed by the conclusion of Ball et al (2012 p8) that assessment practice in most universities has not kept pace with other far-reaching changes in HE and that “a radical rethink of assessment practices and regulations” and a “holistic and proactive approach” is required, the Centre for Excellence in Learning (CEL) at Bournemouth University bravely took up this large-scale challenge. Presenting at the Southampton Solent Community Teaching Conference last year, we thank the participants in our workshop for their insights.

Implementing this vision involved addressing both global and local dimensions of assessment in higher education (Hounsell & Zou 2017). The approach combined radical change to institution-wide assessment policy based on assessment for learning principles (Sambell 2011), and emphased partnership and collaboration in the developing the Toolkit as an Open Educational Resource. The principles-based and evidence-based strategy focused on rebalancing summative and formative assessment tasks; a broader menu of assessment types; and promoting technology-enhanced learning strategies facilitated by a new VLE.  The team drew on tested leadership strategies  (Quinney et al 2017) and invited large-scale engagement through internal and external events to critically inform the process, supported by the expertise of Dai Hounsell, Visiting Professor.   We shared critical reflections on our approach and discuss considerations for toolkit design and construction.

l-r Dr Curie Scott, Prof Dai Hounsell, Anne Quinney, Prof Debbie Holley

Ball et al 2012. A marked improvement: transforming assessment in higher education. York: HEA

Hounsell D and Zou T. 2017. Surfacing and sharing advances in assessment: a communities of practice approach. In: Carless C, Bridges SM, Chan CKY and Glofcheski R (eds) Scaling up assessment for learning in higher education. Singapore: Springer . pp33-48

Quinney A, Lamont C, Biggins D and Holley D. 2017. Optimising disruptive approaches: extending academic roles and identities in higher education. Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education Issue 10

Sambell K. 2011.Rethinking feedback in higher education: an assessment for learning perspective. Escalate. University of Bristol.

Above: The BU team at Solent: Dr Curie Scott,Prof Dai Hounsell, Anne Quinney and Professor Debbie Holley